Book Review: The Kite Runner


April 10, 2019

Ms. Vomero’s senior classes began reading The Kite Runner in mid-March, as part of the curriculum for the senior class. The book was picked by the teacher based on her past experiences with reading the book with her previous students. “For me, I love to keep the students engaged in class. I’ve found that the best way for me to do this is to read a book that they are interested in. In the past, it has been a great time reading The Kite Runner because my students have loved the elements of the novel, especially the plot. I personally enjoy reading this book too,” Ms. Vomero said.

This year, Ms. Vomero continued the past success of reading this novel. The students were asked to complete a questionnaire packet that goes along with the story. To go along with the questionnaire packet, the seniors were also given a character list to help them follow along. 

Ryan Morphy, a current Cathedral Prep senior and student of Ms. Vomero, has nothing but positive remarks to say about the process of reading The Kite Runner. When asked about how the process of reading the book went, he said “It was a great book, but [it] dealt with a lot of dark topics in society. It made me think about a lot of things, especially about Afghanistan. I used to have the typical stereotype of Afghanistan and how it was a terrible place, but after reading the book, I now understand there are positives.” 

The Kite Runner is a novel written by an Afghan-American author, Khalid Hosseini. It tells the story of a young Afghanistan boy, Amir, who lives the everyday struggle of living in Afghanistan. Amir is a member of the higher class, while Hassan, Amir’s best friend, is part of the Hazaras (lower class). These two kids live their lives together, with inevitable struggles scattered throughout their friendship. All throughout the story, Amir encounters guilt and redemption from his childhood past. Amir separates himself from his past by moving to the United States of America, but he ends up getting a second chance at “being good again.”

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